24 September 2014 - 10:53
News Code 2738533
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Press Panorama

Tehran, Sept 24, IRNA - The following news summaries appeared in some Persian-language newspapers Wednesday morning:

Four rats for each Tehran resident

Etemad: Colonies of rats, whose population is estimated at 50 million, roam the sewers of Iranian capital Tehran.

A report released by Tehran City Council indicates that the number of rodents in the teeming metropolis has almost quadrupled compared to its 12 million human population.

These rodents belong to the Norwegian species. They are stronger than mice and suck blood. They also feed on small or dead mice.

Each of the rodents can give birth to a litter of 6 to 20 rats every three months, which transmits 35 kinds of viruses and diseases.

When these rats become hungry, they attack humans and animals.

Mohammad Haqqani, a senior member of the council, said the eradication of each rat in Tehran costs about $40, which hampers efforts to get rid of them.

In 2008, rats attacked a village in Sabzevar, Khorasan Razavi province, and forced its residents to flee their homes. The village had 850 residents.



School dropout rate alarming

Ebtekar: Concurrent with the start of the new academic year (September 23), a significant number of students have dropped out of school.

The inauspicious start breeds crimes and social transgressions.

In the last academic year, about 40,000 students abandoned education. They account for a large number of delinquencies.

Over 50 percent of the delinquents, who are under 18 years, have abandoned school.

The Education Ministry has announced that hundreds of thousands of teenagers have not registered in the ongoing academic year.

The number of students entitled to start their first year of school is estimated at 7.16 million, which should mark a 150,000-rise compared to the corresponding figure of last year.

The ministry also said over 13,000 children, who should join primary schools, are missing.

Experts believe either poverty or unemployment among the educated strata discourages certain families from sending their children to school.



Hardliners threaten NY passengers

Arman: On the eve of President Hassan Rouhani’s trip to the 69th annual meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, hardliners are resorting to disruptive behavior to show their objection to the détente policy adopted by the government regarding ties with the West.

Despite considerable efforts made by Rouhani to patch up relations with the West, hardliners have launched a committee to “protect national interests”.

Rouhani’s remarks about patching up ties with the United States have opened a can of worms for these elements, whose interests depend upon having hostile relations with the international community.

Hardliners claim that amelioration of ties between Tehran and Washington paves the way for the latter’s insidious attempt to oust the Islamic establishment.

They also claim Iranians expect lawmakers to table a censure motion against Rouhani if he meets his US counterpart Barack Obama during his stay in New York.



Judiciary discloses clandestine affairs of jailed mogul

Mardomsalari: Although the business mogul, Babak Zanjani, is in jail, he has communicated with clandestine groups and individuals, said the Judiciary’s First Deputy Gholamhossein Mohseni Ejei.

The oil tycoon, who struck it rich due to the imposition of US sanctions on Iran during the tenure of former president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, has been held on charges of corruption and embezzlement.

Ejei said elements, who were in touch with the tycoon, have also been identified and arrested.

The top Judiciary official said Zanjani used three fake ID cards as a cover-up for his unlawful activities.

Ejei said not only the Oil Ministry but also other individuals and bodies have lodged complaints against the “fat cat”.



What’s going on in New York?

Kayhan: Unless Iranian nuclear negotiators either cross the redlines or succumb to the exorbitant demands of the West, no final nuclear deal will be reached between Tehran and the major world powers.

Attempts to normalize ties with the Unites States aimed at easing sanctions will also fail because of hostile approaches adopted by the US toward the Islamic Republic.

Despite a phone conversation between President Hassan Rouhani and his counterpart Barack Obama after last year’s UN General Assembly meeting, Washington imposed a new round of sanctions on Tehran.

The United States, known as the “Great Satan” in Iran, intends to tempt Iranian negotiators to taste the “forbidden fruit” of meeting American officials.

While the US suffered abject failures in Iraq, Afghanistan, Palestine and Lebanon, the Islamic Republic has always emerged victorious.

Since Americans seek to undermine Iran’s clout, the Iranian delegates must shrug off their passive role and exert full authority to safeguard national interests regarding the country’s nuclear rights.



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